Montag, 30. Dezember 2013

Tomatoes and Coffee - Short Socks

After knitting a pair of Charade socks (pattern by Sandra Park on Ravelry), I started to "research" other sock types and came across the "sweet tomato heel" technique - and I wanted to try it :)
(Another type of heel would be the yo-yo heel, ... maybe I'll try that one later ...)

So, these short socks use the sweet tomato-heel technique by Cat Bordhi (http://catbordhi.com/) and a stitch that's called coffee bean pattern (Kaffeebohnenmuster).

This is not a complete pattern, but just a rough sketch.




Techiques:
  • The "Coffee Bean Pattern" consists of 4 rows.
    Row 1: p1 k2 p1
    Row 2: p1 k1 yo k1
    Row 3: p1 k3 p1
    Row 4: p1 sl1 k2 psso p1

Instructions:
With 3.25mm needles CO60
With 2.5mm needles knit 10 rows of ribbing
Switch to 3mm needles and knit 3 sets of coffee bean pattern
Knit tomato heel (while knitting the full rounds, continue coffee bean pattern on the front third)
Continue the foot, knitting coffee bean pattern on the front third and stockinette on the backside (2 thirds).
When foot is long enough, do toe decreases and graft leftover stitches.

Montag, 23. Dezember 2013

Brioche in Montreux

I called this cowl "Brioche in Montreux" because I knitted part of it on the way to the Christmas market in Montreux.
A two-colour brioche technique is used with three cabling strands distributed around the cowl. Since it's a brioche pattern, it's reversible - both sides are equally attractive.

After blocking it had a circumference of 60 cm and a height of 29 cm.




Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.



Materials
  • 30-40 grams of fingering weight yarn (Colour A)
  • 30-40 grams of fingering weight yarn (Colour B)
  • 3.5mm circular needles
  • 3 stitch markers
  • tapestry needle (to weave in ends)

Abbreviations
  • The abbreviations brk & yfsl1yo, brp & sl1yof are taken from briochestitch.com
  • C8F: make a front cross cable over 8 stitches, i.e. put 4 stitches (here this means on a cable needle and leave them in front of your piece, knit the next 4 stitches from the left needle (in this case the 4 stitches are knitted: sl1yof, brp, sl1yof, brp), then knit the 4 stitches from the cable needle (i.e.  sl1yof, brp, sl1yof, brp).
  • C8B: make a back cross cable over 8 stitches, i.e. put 4 stitches on a cable needle and leave them in the back of your piece,  knit the next 4 stitches from the left needle (in this case the 4 stitches are knitted: sl1yof, brp, sl1yof, brp), then knit the 4 stitches from the cable needle (i.e.  sl1yof, brp, sl1yof, brp).

Techniques


Instructions
CO120 stitches with colour B (white on the photo), placing a stitch marker after 40sts, 80 sts and 120 sts.
Join in round

Round 1a (Colour A): * p1 sl1yof (repeat from * to end)
Round 1b (Colour B): * yfsl1yo brk (repeat from * to end)
 
Round 2a (Colour A): * brp1 sl1yof (repeat from * to end of round)
Round 2b (Colour B): * yfsl1yo brk (repeat from * to end of round)

Repeat rounds 2a and 2b a total of 4 times


Round 5a (Colour A): * brp1 sl1yof (repeat from * a total of 3 times), C8F, +brp1 sl1yof (repeat from + to next marker);
    * brp1 sl1yof (repeat from * a total of 3 times), C8F, +brp1 sl1yof (repeat from + to next marker);
    * brp1 sl1yof (repeat from * a total of 3 times), C8F, +brp1 sl1yof (repeat from + to end of round)
Round 5b (Colour B): * yfsl1yo brk (repeat from * to end of round)

Repeat rounds 2a and 2b a total of 3 times

Round 9a (Colour A): brp 1 sl1yof, C8B, C8B *brp1 ysl1yof (repeat from * to next marker);
     brp 1 sl1yof, C8B, C8B *brp1 ysl1yof (repeat from * to next marker);
     brp 1 sl1yof, C8B, C8B *brp1 ysl1yof (repeat from * to next end of round)
Round 9b (Colour B): * yfsl1yo brk (repeat from * to end of round)

Repeat rounds 2a and 2b a total of 3 times

Round 13a = Round 5a
Round 13b = Round 5b

Repeat rounds 2a and 2b a total of 5 times - you have now completed round 18b

Repeat from round 5a to round 18b a total of 5 times, ending with round 17b - or until the cowl has reached your desired height.

Bind off in a p1k1-pattern using colour B. 

Weave in ends - and block.

Freitag, 13. Dezember 2013

Triangulation Wrist Warmers

Knitted in one piece without cutting the yarn, these mitts formed first in a triangular then diagonal shape. They are first knitted back and forth, then in the round, then back and forth and in the end in the round again. Since they are knitted in one piece, you won't have to cut your yarn and you'll only have two ends to weave in per mitt.

Since they don't cover much of the hands, they are rather wrist warmers than fingerless gloves. 


About 4 years after publishing this pattern, Bernadette from Törtchens Blog tried to translate this pattern into German (thank you!!). And during the course of this translation, she discovered quite a few mistakes. So, in October 2017 I duly corrected them.

The German translation is available here.
Eine deutsche Übersetzung findet sich hier. (erstellt von Bernadette von Törtchens Blog)





Creative Commons License
This work by Knitting and so on is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


Materials
  • about 40 grams of fingering weight yarn
  • 2.5 mm needles
  • 3 (different) stitch markers


Techniques:


Construction

These mitts are constructed in a different manner of the normal in-the-round loom-style fingerless gloves. They are started at the lower edge with only 4 stitches CO. Then a triangle is knitted flat (part I); when the lower edge is wide enough, both ends are joined in the round and knitted upwards diagonally (part 2). Part 3 is knitted flat with decreases at the upper end, while part 4 is knitted in the round again, drecreasing again until thumb width is reached (see picture on the right).



Instructions

Part I - knitted flat

CO4
Set-up row: k2 place marker k2 (this marker will be called middle marker)
Row 1: kfb; k to st before marker kfb; slip marker; kfb k to last stitch; kfb
Row 2: k
Repeat until there are 60 sts on your needles (or until the lower edge is wide enough to fit around your wrists).
End with row 1,
then join in round - place marker (this marker will be called end marker)


Part II - in the round

Round 1: k
Round 2: k2tog; k until 1 st before middle marker; kfb; slip marker; kfb; k until 2 sts before end marker; ssk
Repeat these 2 rounds a total of 5 times

Round 11: p
Round 12: k2tog; k until 1 st before middle marker; kfb; slip marker; kfb; k until 2 sts before end marker; ssk
Repeat rounds 11 and 12 a total of 5 times

Round 21: k
Round 22: k2tog; k until 1 st before middle marker; kfb; slip marker; kfb; k until 2 sts before end marker; ssk
Repeat rounds 21 and 22 a total of 5 times

Round 31: p
Round 32: k2tog; k until 1 st before middle marker; kfb; slip marker; kfb; k until 2 sts before end marker; ssk
Repeat rounds 31 and 32 a total of 5 times

Round 41: k
Round 42: k2tog; k until 1 st before middle marker; kfb; slip marker; kfb; k until 2 sts before end marker; ssk
Repeat rounds 41 and 42 a total of 5 times

Afterwards k to middle marker - remove middle marker; and TURN WORK.
Now there is only one marker left.


Part III - knitted flat

Row 1: k to last stitch before end – if you want to avoid a gap at the upper outer edge, you can now connect the first and last stitches of that row like this: slip the last stitch to the right needle and - using a crochet hook - draw the working yarn through the first stitch of that row, put the loop on the left needle, move the last (not yet knitted) stitch back to the left needle, knit the two stitches together (see picture on the left). Alternatively, just knit the last stitch.

Row 2: ssk; k until the last two stitches; k2tog
Row 3: k
Row 4: ssk; k until two stitches before marker; ssk; slip marker; k2tog; k until two stitches before end; k2tog
Row 5: k
Repeat rows 2-5 rows twice more more.

Row 11: p
Row 12:  ssk; k until two stitches before marker; ssk; slip marker; k2tog; k until two stitches before end; k2tog
Row 13: p
Row 14: ssk; k until the last two stitches; k2tog
(if you started part 2 at 60 stitches, you should now have 40 sts on your needles)

Place marker (this will be called M2) and add 20 stitches by using a knitted cast on – place marker (this is the new „round end marker“) join in round. The picture on the right shows the naming and placement of the markers. I opted to distribute the stitches on three needles instead of using markers.



Part IV & thumb - knitted in the round

Round 1: k to M2: ssk *k1 p1 (repeat from * to two sts before) marker k2tog slip marker (this creates a small ribbing at the upper edge to prevent it from rolling)
Round 2: k to M2: ssk *p1 k1 (repeat from * to two sts before) marker k2tog slip marker (this creates a small ribbing at the upper edge to prevent it from rolling)
Round 3 = Round 1

Round 4: ssk k to two stitches before marker k2tog, repeat once more; you're now at M2, ssk *p1 k1 (repeat from * to two sts before) marker k2tog slip marker
Round 5: ssk k to two stitches before marker k2tog; repeat three times
Round 6: k all

Round 7 = Round 5
Round 8 = Round 5
Round 9 = Round 6

Repeat rounds 7 to 9 once more

 – if you started part 2 at 60 stitches, you should now have 18 sts on your needles.

For the thumb, knit 9 rounds of k2 p1-ribbing, bind off in pattern in 10th round.
Weave in ends.

Make two.